How to Replicate Rory McIroy’s Process

July 21, 2014

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Rory McIlroy is one of the most talented young golfers to come along in a long time. He recently won his third major championship, the British Open, by two shots. McIlroy had been through a tough stretch both professionally and personally but was finally able to put it all together to win a big tournament. Asked later what the keys were to his victory, he responded that he had focused on two words the whole week. Process and Spot. The latter he focused on in his putting game, making sure the ball rolled over a certain spot so the put stayed on line to the hole. But the first word is the one that caught my attention, process.

Many golfers don’t focus on process, we focus on results. When we hit a golf shot, the only marker of success is whether or not the ball went where we wanted it to go. But having a good result may or may not be because a golfer did the right thing. There are so many variables that can affect where a ball goes when it’s hit. Often I have hit what I thought was a great shot, but it ends up in the wrong spot. Likewise there have been times where I would hit a poor shot and it would end up on the green. But McIlroy changed his approach. He decided to focus on the process of giving himself the best chance to hit a good shot and leave it at that. He would calculate the distance, the wind, the shape of the shot, and where he wanted it to go. Then he would choose the club, make a controlled swing, and live with the result.

Often our churches look at one portion of the generosity journey, the result. We look at what was given on a specific Sunday or in a specific month and deem our process successful or not successful. But in reality that may not be the case. The generosity process may have been poor, but a large giver may have given that week which inflates the numbers. Or maybe that same giver forgot to give one month while on vacation, and the numbers seem down. Why not focus on the process, and study all the available data?

That is essentially why we began the Generosity Audit. We want to see your process, and dig deeper in the data. What happens during your offering time? Does your Pastor embody generosity? How well are you telling your church’s story? Let’s get the process correct to give you the best possible chance of success.

We’ve also now introduced a new tool to dig deeper in the data. Instead of looking at a month and seeing the total gifts, what if you could see how many first time givers have joined in, and how many long time givers have dropped off? What if, with one click, you could see how big of a burden your high capacity givers are carrying? Those are the type of metrics to track in order to judge the process.

Take Rory’s advice, focus on the process and the results will take care of themselves. If I can help break down the process for you in a Generosity Audit, let me know!

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